Still in Translation

AHRC 10th anniv logo23rd February – 22nd June 2015 – and onwards
curated by Ricarda Vidal & Maria-José Blanco 

In early 2015 we were awarded a grant from the Arts & Humanities Research Council to develop a new Translation Game, which took place during spring and early summer and resulted in the creation of a virtual exhibition for the AHRC image gallery. We see this award as acknowledgement of the relevance of Translation Games to current research within the arts and humanities.

'Still in Translation' as a fold-out artist-book, produced by Ricarda Vidal

‘Still in Translation’ as a fold-out artist-book, produced by Ricarda Vidal

 

Denise Riley‘s unpublished poem Still provided the source text for the game. In the usual TG manner, the poem was given to an artist with the commission to translate the words into imagery. The artist passed on their image (but not the original text) to another artist asking them to translate into another image, which was passed on to the next artist. In this way the work was translated through a chain of 12 artists, each working with the medium of their choice and each producing an original translation of the work created by the previous artist in the chain. They could use any medium as long as the work could be depicted as a digital still image. We also asked each artist to provide us and the next person in the chain with a brief commentary on their translation.
The final image was subject to a poetry competition in which participants were asked to retranslate the work into words.
Finally, and with recourse to all the different versions of ‘Still’, Maria-José and Ricarda produced literary translations of ‘Still’ into Spanish and German.

 

The translation chain of ‘Still’

Watch a video presentation of the results of the game.
This is quite slow-moving giving you ample time to contemplate the original poem and its various visual translations. Scroll down if you’re in a hurry and look at the poem and images in your own time.

‘Still’ by Denise Riley

Still FINAL D Rileyclick here for German and Spanish translations of ‘Still’

Translation of ‘Still’ by Sam Treadaway, 4-11 March 2015

Sam Treadaway, 'Techno-Techno-Techno', 4-11 March 2015: "Reading Still I was immediately reminded of a book I'd recently read discussing connections (and tensions) between the natural and digital worlds. Upon re-readings of Still such ideas provided the basis of my understanding, deciphering and transformation of its text. The 'translation' process was initiated by converting Still into computer binary code. Adapting the outcome I endeavoured to capture the essence of Still in a single image. I am neutral and non-attached as to the success of this process and wish my fellow artists an interesting and rewarding match."

Sam Treadaway, ‘Techno-Techno-Techno-Techno’, digital image: “Reading Still I was immediately reminded of a book I’d recently read discussing connections (and tensions) between the natural and digital worlds. Upon re-readings of Still such ideas provided the basis of my understanding, deciphering and transformation of its text. The ‘translation’ process was initiated by converting Still into computer binary code. Adapting the outcome I endeavoured to capture the essence of Still in a single image. I am neutral and non-attached as to the success of this process and wish my fellow artists an interesting and rewarding match.”

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Translation of Sam’s image by Auriol Herford, 11-18 March 2015

Sam Treadaway, 'Techno-Techno-Techno', 4-11 March 2015: "Reading Still I was immediately reminded of a book I'd recently read discussing connections (and tensions) between the natural and digital worlds. Upon re-readings of Still such ideas provided the basis of my understanding, deciphering and transformation of its text. The 'translation' process was initiated by converting Still into computer binary code. Adapting the outcome I endeavoured to capture the essence of Still in a single image. I am neutral and non-attached as to the success of this process and wish my fellow artists an interesting and rewarding match."

Auriol Herford, no title, 11-18 March 2015: "Taking the lead from  Sam and his  interest in the connections between the natural and digital world, I reflected on the idea of my instinct and relation to technology.  Last week I had  a caesarean birth followed by a week of  rigorous monitoring . Every night over the last year I have also  plugged a catheter bag onto  my eldest son.  I translated the medical  objects and fragments from the experience into an image that used  printmaking, drawing and collage. "

Auriol Herford, no title, print, drawing, and collage: “Taking the lead from Sam and his interest in the connections between the natural and digital world, I reflected on the idea of my instinct and relation to technology. Last week I had a caesarean birth followed by a week of rigorous monitoring . Every night over the last year I have also plugged a catheter bag onto my eldest son. I translated the medical objects and fragments from the experience into an image that used printmaking, drawing and collage. “

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Translation of Auriol’s image by Katarina Kelsey, 18-25 March 2015

Auriol Herford, no title, 11-18 March 2015: "Taking the lead from  Sam and his  interest in the connections between the natural and digital world, I reflected on the idea of my instinct and relation to technology.  Last week I had  a caesarean birth followed by a week of  rigorous monitoring . Every night over the last year I have also  plugged a catheter bag onto  my eldest son.  I translated the medical  objects and fragments from the experience into an image that used  printmaking, drawing and collage. " 

Katarina Kelsey, no title, 18-25 March 2015: "I was given some contextual background to Auriol’s translation of Sam’s piece that I initially thought I would base my translation on. However I felt unable to translate her narrative and realised I would only be interpreting it. Ultimately I turned to a material translation to translate some of the key themes of her work. Taking inspiration for my method from translations such as Holderlin’s Antigone and Christian Hawkey’s Ventrakl,  I hope my material translation can convey Auriol’s piece to you."

Katarina Kelsey, no title, resin, paint: “I was given some contextual background to Auriol’s translation of Sam’s piece that I initially thought I would base my translation on. However I felt unable to translate her narrative and realised I would only be interpreting it. Ultimately I turned to a material translation to translate some of the key themes of her work. Taking inspiration for my method from translations such as Holderlin’s Antigone and Christian Hawkey’s Ventrakl, I hope my material translation can convey Auriol’s piece to you.”

 

Translation of Katarina’s image by Bryan Eccleshall, 25 March – 1st April 2015

Katarina Kelsey, no title, 18-25 March 2015: "I was given some contextual background to Auriol’s translation of Sam’s piece that I initially thought I would base my translation on. However I felt unable to translate her narrative and realised I would only be interpreting it. Ultimately I turned to a material translation to translate some of the key themes of her work. Taking inspiration for my method from translations such as Holderlin’s Antigone and Christian Hawkey’s Ventrakl,  I hope my material translation can convey Auriol’s piece to you."

Bryan Eccleshall, 'Master Square', 25 March - 1st April 2015: "Translators ordinarily shift things into their own language. Following that precedent I have made a drawing of a photograph using a technique developed over the last couple of years, but with a slight difference. I took the photograph I was sent and edited it to make sixteen square images that when assembled would resemble the image I was given, but this time as a drawing. I took care to be faithful to the source and translated the whole image. normally I leave a thin white border around each panel, which forms a grid when the image is put together. I decided not to do that this time, because I wanted the rupture between each drawing more clearly as evidence of my process, without over-stating it. The thing I made is a drawing, but for the purposes of this exercise you, Sarah, will be working from a jpeg of that drawing, assembled by me in PhotoShop from individual scans."

Bryan Eccleshall, ‘Master Square’, pencil drawing and digital collage: “Translators ordinarily shift things into their own language. Following that precedent I have made a drawing of a photograph using a technique developed over the last couple of years, but with a slight difference. I took the photograph I was sent and edited it to make sixteen square images that when assembled would resemble the image I was given, but this time as a drawing. I took care to be faithful to the source and translated the whole image. normally I leave a thin white border around each panel, which forms a grid when the image is put together. I decided not to do that this time, because I wanted the rupture between each drawing more clearly as evidence of my process, without over-stating it.
The thing I made is a drawing, but for the purposes of this exercise you, Sarah, will be working from a jpeg of that drawing, assembled by me in PhotoShop from individual scans.” 

 

Translation of Bryan’s image by Sarah Sparkes, 1-8 April 2015

Bryan Eccleshall, 'Master Square', 25 March - 1st April 2015: "Translators ordinarily shift things into their own language. Following that precedent I have made a drawing of a photograph using a technique developed over the last couple of years, but with a slight difference. I took the photograph I was sent and edited it to make sixteen square images that when assembled would resemble the image I was given, but this time as a drawing. I took care to be faithful to the source and translated the whole image. normally I leave a thin white border around each panel, which forms a grid when the image is put together. I decided not to do that this time, because I wanted the rupture between each drawing more clearly as evidence of my process, without over-stating it. The thing I made is a drawing, but for the purposes of this exercise you, Sarah, will be working from a jpeg of that drawing, assembled by me in PhotoShop from individual scans."

Sarah Sparkes, 'Gap between the nothing', 1-8 April 2015: "'The great task of the translator – his madness, his agony, the aporias he confronts – proceeds always from some initial strangeness, from the gap already opened in the idiom of the original text.' (Jacques Derrida) Although I have stayed close, in compositional respects to the work I translated, there is a gap through which something other has slipped in. I don’t mind the gap; the gap is welcome in my translation.  I looked for a long time and frequently at Bryan’s image, I wanted mine to enable me to conjure the ghost of his piece when I look at mine.    I assembled my visual signs - techniques, symbols and material processes that are my own native creative language started making actual objects and photographing them, then created a digital collage from these.  On my computer screen Bryan’s image had a blue cast, which is reflected in my translation."

 Sarah Sparkes, ‘Gap between the nothing’, collage and digital image: “‘The great task of the translator – his madness, his agony, the aporias he confronts – proceeds always from some initial strangeness, from the gap already opened in the idiom of the original text.’ (Jacques Derrida)
Although I have stayed close, in compositional respects to the work I translated, there is a gap through which something other has slipped in. I don’t mind the gap; the gap is welcome in my translation.
I looked for a long time and frequently at Bryan’s image, I wanted mine to enable me to conjure the ghost of his piece when I look at mine.
I assembled my visual signs – techniques, symbols and material processes that are my own native creative language started making actual objects and photographing them, then created a digital collage from these.
On my computer screen Bryan’s image had a blue cast, which is reflected in my translation.”

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Translation of Sarah’s image by Sharon Kivland, 8-15 April 2015

Sharon Kivland, no title. Sharon’s full translation is an animated film, which traces the journey into the mirror and back – watch it on the video above: “I live in two languages, haunted by a third. There is constant movement as a word thought in one language passes into a spoken word in another. This  happens in the life between one image (another’s) and another (mine).  An  image, precisely thought,  is – and passes through – a mirror. This is quite a literal translation of the image that preceded it (the gap or void, the blue cast that is taken from the image before, the decorative detail that might be supposed to be feminine). It is impossible to keep completely still, even when  caught or fixed.”

 

Translation of Sharon’s image by Juneau Projects, 15-22 April 2015

Sharon Kivland, no title, 8-15 April 2015: "I live in two languages, haunted by a third. There is constant movement as a word thought in one language passes into a spoken word in another. This  happens in the life between one image (another's) and another (mine).  An  image, precisely thought,  is – and passes through – a mirror. This is quite a literal translation of the image that preceded it (the gap or void, the blue cast that is taken from the image before, the decorative detail that might be supposed to be feminine). It is impossible to keep completely still, even when  caught or fixed."

We took an element from Sharon's image (the black rectangle) and made this into a physical object. We then photographed the object in a location echoing/paralleling Sharon's image (a canal as moving mirror (in reference to Sharon's video), contemporary artists' studios (the warehouse)). Finally we took inspiration from the quality of Sharon's image itself (a printed reproduction) and digitally printed an object onto the photographed object to produce a crude figure (artist or model).  

Juneau Projects, no title, digitally enhanced photograph installation: “We took an element from Sharon’s image (the black rectangle) and made this into a physical object. We then photographed the object in a location echoing/ paralleling Sharon’s image (a canal as moving mirror (in reference to Sharon’s video), contemporary artists’ studios (the warehouse)). Finally we took inspiration from the quality of Sharon’s image itself (a printed reproduction) and digitally printed an object onto the photographed object to produce a crude figure (artist or model).”

 

Translation of Juneau Projects’ image by Heather Connelly, 22-29 April 2015

We took an element from Sharon's image (the black rectangle) and made this into a physical object. We then photographed the object in a location echoing/paralleling Sharon's image (a canal as moving mirror (in reference to Sharon's video), contemporary artists' studios (the warehouse)). Finally we took inspiration from the quality of Sharon's image itself (a printed reproduction) and digitally printed an object onto the photographed object to produce a crude figure (artist or model). HConnellyTG copy

Heather Connelly, no title, digital collage: “I responded instinctively to the image I was sent being particularly drawn to the formal composition of the photograph itself and its context – where the sculpture had been photographed and objects that surrounded it – in addition to its form and materiality. I sought out similar locations, spending time walking and photographing various elements, using a mirror to interrupt, reflect and deflect what I saw. I then manipulated and collaged some of the images together – layering and modifying them in Photoshop. Towards the end of the process I returned to the original image, making adjustments to align it more closely with the original.”

 

Translation of Heather’s image by Briony Campbell, 29 April – 6 May 2015

HConnellyTG copyBriony Campbell, no title', 29 April - 6 May 2015; "From the image I was given I wanted to represent Heather's vision of water, sky and leaves. I took the clouds directly, and in my image they become they part of the tree - as in Heather's image the plants seem to float towards the clouds. I interpreted her plant pots as the domestic element; at once giving the plants the love they need to grow but also asserting ownership of the natural things. So in my translation the pots became a human holding tight to the tree. I followed her pallet combining Black & white but parred it down a little. Where Heather had repeated the plant pot motif, I took the lights on the horizon of my original seascape and floated them into the sky as stars. The image is a collage of 3 of my own photos (involving long exposures) and one element of Heather's image."

Briony Campbell, no title’, collage of 3 digital photographs: “From the image I was given I wanted to represent Heather’s vision of water, sky and leaves. I took the clouds directly, and in my image they become they part of the tree – as in Heather’s image the plants seem to float towards the clouds. I interpreted her plant pots as the domestic element; at once giving the plants the love they need to grow but also asserting ownership of the natural things. So in my translation the pots became a human holding tight to the tree. I followed her pallet combining Black & white but parred it down a little. Where Heather had repeated the plant pot motif, I took the lights on the horizon of my original seascape and floated them into the sky as stars. The image is a collage of 3 of my own photos (involving long exposures) and one element of Heather’s image.”

 .,

 

 Translation of Briony’s image by Matt Rowe, 6-13th May 2015

Briony Campbell, no title', 29 April - 6 May 2015; "From the image I was given I wanted to represent Heather's vision of water, sky and leaves. I took the clouds directly, and in my image they become they part of the tree - as in Heather's image the plants seem to float towards the clouds. I interpreted her plant pots as the domestic element; at once giving the plants the love they need to grow but also asserting ownership of the natural things. So in my translation the pots became a human holding tight to the tree. I followed her pallet combining Black & white but parred it down a little. Where Heather had repeated the plant pot motif, I took the lights on the horizon of my original seascape and floated them into the sky as stars. The image is a collage of 3 of my own photos (involving long exposures) and one element of Heather's image."Matt Rowe, no title, ceramic objects, digital photograph, 6-13th May 2015:

Matt Rowe, no title, ceramic objects, digital photograph: “In order to translate the previous translation into a three-dimensional ceramic object I have chosen to continue the core narrative of the resampling of the environment. The picture I received to translate was a digital college that suggested ownership of a natural object. This led me to consider harvest, ritual and cultivation of the landscape. The picture I received shows a figure holding a tree transforming into a plume of smoke-like clouds. The composite image visually resembled some kind of offering. suspended within a seascape. For the translation into ceramics I constructed a chalice-like ceramic vessel fired within a temple-like Kiln structure which is a space of votive offering. The combustive fuel used to fire the vessel was harvested from the seashore, consisting of seaweed and wood. When combusted the materials leave a carbon imprint on the body of the ceramic. Within the temple-like structure I have attempted a reprocessing of materials abundant within the seascape of my hometown of Folkestone. I’m attempting to use the combustive and transformative ceramic process, performative Alchemy.

 

Translation of Matt’s image by Anna Cady, 13-20 May 2015

Matt Rowe, no title, ceramic objects, digital photograph, 6-13th May 2015:

A funeral urn?  Cremating, containing or representing the body?   Black. Luminous. A sinister fairy tale Hand made and performative.   Air and fire inside the body as vessel.  Air as breath. Internal and external.  Containing and representing air simultaneously? Transforming ‘air’ into a solid ‘thing’    I perceive the central part of the vessel in Matt’s photograph as being made of glass.  The colour, beauty and fragility of the projected, reflected colours in my film-still is as if it is to be seen as, or made of, glass.    Just before it melts.

Anna Cady, no title, film still: “A funeral urn?
Cremating, containing or representing the body?
Black. Luminous. A sinister fairy tale
Hand made and performative.
Air and fire inside the body as vessel.
Air as breath. Internal and external.
Containing and representing air simultaneously? Transforming ‘air’ into a solid ‘thing’
I perceive the central part of the vessel in Matt’s photograph as being made of glass.
The colour, beauty and fragility of the projected, reflected colours in my film-still is as if it is to be seen as, or made of, glass.
Just before it melts.”

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Translation of Anna’s image by Domingo Martinez, 20-27 May 2015

A funeral urn?  Cremating, containing or representing the body?   Black. Luminous. A sinister fairy tale Hand made and performative.   Air and fire inside the body as vessel.  Air as breath. Internal and external.  Containing and representing air simultaneously? Transforming ‘air’ into a solid ‘thing’    I perceive the central part of the vessel in Matt’s photograph as being made of glass.  The colour, beauty and fragility of the projected, reflected colours in my film-still is as if it is to be seen as, or made of, glass.    Just before it melts.

Darkness, blur and an arm in blue, green and red colours.  Fear, suspicion and fragility.  I perceive Susan’s image as a metaphor of wish and desire, but also of nostalgia and melancholy. The hand awaiting for someone or for something to hold, or maybe just to be held.  When I first saw it, it remind me to a photograph I bought in a flea market. In it I could see an arm with the same view and a hand holding a child’s hand.  I took that piece of the picture and drew it separately. That allowed me to express my own feelings through it.  Then I reproduced the atmosphere in Susan’s picture, which I find very suggestive and close to the nostalgic feeling I wanted to show. It is an feeling linked to a memory.  Please, keep holding my hand as you used to do when I was a child.  I now hold that memory as it is about to drop, to vanish.  When you held my hand I felt safe and secure; it was like walking along the right path.  If your hand loses strength, everything becomes dark and blurred. Just some light let me see the path. 

Domingo Martínez, no title, drawing, found object, photograph:  “Darkness, blur and an arm in blue, green and red colours. Fear, suspicion and fragility. I perceive Anna’s image as a metaphor of wish and desire, but also of nostalgia and melancholy. The hand waiting for someone or for something to hold, or maybe just to be held. When I first saw it, it reminded me of a photograph I bought in a flea market. In it I could see an arm from the same angle and a hand holding a child’s hand.  I took that piece of the picture and drew it separately. That allowed me to express my own feelings through it. Then I reproduced the atmosphere in Anna’s picture, which I found very suggestive and close to the nostalgic feeling I wanted to show. It is a feeling linked to a memory.
Please, keep holding my hand as you used to do when I was a child.  I now hold that memory as it is about to drop, to vanish.  When you held my hand I felt safe and secure; it was like walking along the right path.  If your hand loses strength, everything becomes dark and blurred. Just some light let me see the path.

Retranslation into Poetry, 8-20 June 2015

In the shape of a competition we asked poets to translate Domingo’s image back into words before the original poem and its translations were revealed. Below is the winning poem by Danielle Emtage. If you would like to see all entries please click here.

DomingoM_Translation 

Danielle Emtage

The soul draws breath – hold – release.
A memory spent. Reflect. Unease
your hand from the hold on your heart in the heat
of the moment.

Pause.

The hand draws out. A photograph.
A memory found, all too hard
is the hold of the hand on the heart in the heat
of the moment.

Reflect.

Still is the night, rage is the soul.
Pain is the shape of the hole in my whole.
The heart in the hold of the hand is a fix –
temporary treatment for an infinite mix
of blue and of red, of ice that I bled,
of hell that I cried while wishing the dead
were alive.

Still is the night and still I cannot.
Neither can X nor Y nor God.

Still is the night, and still must my soul
be still, learn to relinquish the hold.

Translator’s Note:
I chose to focus on an overall emotional response to the image, attempting to evoke with the poem a similar response in a reader as the image did in me. Some physical details including objects and colour were taken as literally as they were presented, with context being inferred and imagined.

 

 

Still Leben

übersetzt von Ricarda Vidal

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Du bist tot, aber du flackerst noch immer bläulich – ich möchte

niemanden heimsuchen und so wie du, immer wieder

in meinem Augenwinkel auftauchen, es ist zum Verrücktwerden.

Lieber starr werden, blockhaft, Granit sein, nicht

schwirren und flirren, sondern stockstill festsitzen, eine Platte aus Stein.

Nicht Fisch werden, oder Meer, nichts Flüssiges, kein Hin und Her

kein Aufwallen nach meinem Tod in den Mündern der Lebenden

der wenigen Betroffenen. Was werden sie aus diesem

großen künftigen Klumpen meiner selbst machen, wer weiß, doch

sie mögen beruhigt sein. Er möge still halten. Aber es soll sie

auch dann nicht beschweren, wenn trotz seiner steinernen Masse

etwas spontanes, für das niemand planen konnte,

das niemand schaffen konnte, dem nicht abgeholfen,

das nicht ausgeblendet oder unterdrückt werden kann,

trotz allem mit aller Kraft im Leben bleiben will.

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Inmóvil

traducido por Maria-José Blanco

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Estas muerto pero aun tienes un parpadeo azulado – Yo no

quiero gafar a nadie apareciendo de repente como haces tú

justo por la esquina de mi ojo, es una locura.

Prefiero solidificarme, hacerme bloque, ser granito, no

zumbar y no resplandecer si no alojarme en una existencia inmóvil, una losa.

No hacerme pez, o mar, nada fluido, nada rápido

no hacerme mejor tras mi muerte en las bocas de los vivos

esos pocos interesados. Qué pensarían de este

hacerme un gran bloque de mi misma, quién sabe, aunque

dejadles que sean benévolos. Dejadle seguir inerte. Pero que

lo aguanten despreocupados, a pesar de su inmovilidad de piedra

algo impulsado por sí mismo que nadie pudo planear

o fabricar o ayudar o descartar o atenuar

despliega su propia lucha para seguir vivo.

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Related Workshops

9th May 2015, 2.00 – 3.30 pm
Still at Wokingham Library
Wokingham;
workshop led by Katrina Barnes & Ricarda Vidal

 

12th June 2015, 1.30 – 2.30pm
Still at School
Twyford C of E High School, Acton;
a translation game for Year 12 students based on ‘Still’, led by Ricarda Vidal & Maria-José Blanco  in collaboration with teachers at the school

 

 

Artist Biographies

Anna Cady “I often work with people who have a need to tell their story, and who find that being creative gives them not only a voice, but also hope. I make my own work through and beside them whilst enabling them to make theirs, which is both inspiring and satisfying. So now I find myself collaborating with scholars and artists from other disciplines through my current project Elemental Dialogues ­ ‘Air’. Exploring what it means to interpret film­poems (but not to translate!) as I pass our film ‘Air’ on to other artists for interpretation. We find that there is no one truth, there are only competing stories. My short films have screened nationally (including Tate Modern) and internationally (2013 selected for Sundance Film Festival) but I prefer to present films within site specific installations where the site lends yet another layer to the interpretation.” www.annacady.com  www.elementaldialogues.co.uk
Blog and site for Air project:  www.talkthinkmake.wordpress.com

Briony Campbell Briony is a freelance documentary photographer and filmmaker recognised for her ability to capture the subtleties of relationships, through sensitive yet playful imagery. In 2009 she graduated from London College of Communication’s Masters in documentary photography. That year ‘The Dad Project’ became a formative chapter for her personally and professionally. The Project was exhibited, published and awarded internationally. Briony’s work has been exhibited and published in Europe, Africa and China. Recent clients include London’s Southbank Centre, The Photographer’s Gallery and The National Health Service. She is currently studying Britain’s contemporary relationship with Africa, through the lives of mixed nationality couples in East Africa.www.brionycampbell.com

Heather Connelly Heather is an artist, researcher and lecturer. Her PhD by Fine Art practice from Loughborough University was a transdisciplinary enquiry into art-and-translation. Her multi-media artworks use text, language and the voice to create translation zones, soundworks, publications, installations, events and performances that engage the audience in the process of translation and examine what can be gained in intercultural communication from a monolingual perspective: http://voiceofanother.wordpress.com/. She is co-founder and curator of InDialogue, a series of events/symposia and forthcoming publications that use dialogue to explore dialogical practices: http://indialogue2014.wordpress.com and a Post Doctoral Researcher with the Centre for Chinese Visual Arts at Birmingham City University. 

Bryan Eccleshall Since returning to art practice in 2001, Bryan has helped co-ordinate the FRED art festival and completed an MA at Sheffield Hallam University. He is now researching a practice-led Fine Art PhD at the same institution – due to finish late 2015 – investigating the relationship between drawing and translation. Bryan’s work has been exhibited around the UK and abroad and a collaboration with German artist Karl Heinz Jeron was published in Tegel: Speculations and Propositions (Berlin: The Green Box, 2013). A recent solo exhibition – 365drawings – at Bank Street Arts in Sheffield showcased a series of drawings, one for each day of 2013.

Auriol Herford Being in dialogue with others through visual language, especially with children, has become my medium. I call it ‘a conversation in drawing’. The tangible state of materials from fabric to ink and clay can all be the medium for this conversation. Since graduating with a fine art degree in Chile in 1999 (specialising in painting and printmaking) I have pursued Art as a career in a collaborative way working with children and adults in various settings from schools to the studio. Stories, be they fairytales or personal narratives, weave a context for these conversations and create a platform for different lines of enquiry. Currently the theme  ‘man to myth’  resonates in the studio with the children , as well as in my own  work at home, where personal myths are being reconstructed…

Katarina Kelsey Exploring the morbid themes of translation, I use the materiality of text and its support as a corporeal setting for an incorporeal motif. I try to dissect the translation process and dissemination of knowledge, seeing translation itself as a material performance akin to the material performance and theatre of séance. Studying for a Masters in Book Arts at Camberwell College of Arts, University of the Arts London, I question tactility, authenticity and authorship through the exploration of the book and within materialisation in translation. http://katarinakelseybookarts.tumblr.com/

Juneau Projects Juneau Projects is the collaborative visual art practice of Philip Duckworth and Ben Sadler. We began working together in 2001 and have exhibited widely both nationally and internationally. We work across a broad range of mediums including painting, sculpture, animation, performance, music and installation. Much of our work is made in collaboration with other people and focuses on the relationship between people and the natural world. We are interested in how nature is perceived through the lens of technology, folk art and other human mediation. Throughout our career we have looked at how we can work in a hands-on way with modern technology to produce interesting and bespoke artworks. In tandem with this we are fascinated by the increasingly rapid obsolescence of technology and the impact of this phenomenon upon the objects that artists make. Juneau Projects have previously exhibited at venues including Tate Britain(London), PS1 (New York), Frankfurter Kunstverein (Frankfurt), J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles), SMART Project Space (Amsterdam), Grizedale Arts (Cumbria), IKON (Birmingham), Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale (Japan), European Triennial of Small Sculpture (Slovenia), CAC (Vilnius), Tatton Park Biennial (UK) and were included in Hayward Gallery’s touring exhibition British Art Show 6. Juneau Projects work is in a number of collections including the Zabludowicz  Collection, KPN and New Art Gallery Walsall. www.juneauprojects.co.uk

Sharon Kivland Sharon Kivland is an artist and writer. She is Reader in Fine Art at Sheffield Hallam University. Her work considers what is put at stake by art, politics, and psychoanalysis. She is represented by Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer, Düsseldorf, Johan Deumans Gallery, Amsterdam, and Galerie des petits carreaux, Paris and St-Briac. Her latest book in the series Freud on Holiday, entitled A Cavernous Defile. Part I, was published in December 2013 by Cube Art Editions, Athens, and is currently being translated into Italian. Her last solo exhibition was at CGP, London, entitled Folles de leur corps / Crazy about their bodies after a footnote in Marx’s Capital. She is currently reproducing the footnotes of Capital , chapter by chapter, as a series of pamphlets with a dust-jacket in Financial Times pink, each with a tipped-in photograph of nicely-shod women’s feet as a frontispiece. www.sharonkivland.com

Domingo Martinez Domingo Martinez holds a PhD (International Honours) in Fine Arts from the University of Valencia. He was awarded a BA in Fine Arts from the University of Salamanca in 2006 and a Masters in Artistic Production from the University of Valencia in 2007. He was awarded an Erasmus Scholarship to study at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome and has been the recipient of a Fellowship at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Domingo‘s thesis  “Artwork as counter monument: representation of the unheroic memory as a resource for contemporary art” explored the theory and practice of contemporary art, utilising cultural memory theories to analyse the methods through which twenty artists use ‘memory’ in their work. The artists’ works contribute to contemporary debates around notions of cultural memory and question the traditional idea of history of something that is absolute and unsusceptible to change. Domingo is also an accomplished artist and has been the recipient of several prestigeous scholarships, including the Francisco de Zurbarán award (Junta de Extremadura, 2008), a residency at the Antonio Gala Foundation for Young Artists (Córdoba, 2007) as well as participating in Living Art Terra IV Sanxenxo (Pontevedra, 2006). As a practitioner and academic, Domingo often crosses boundaries in his work, uniting theory with practice. His work has been shown in several solo and group exhibitions in Spain and the United Kingdom. Domingo is currently working as a secondary school art teacher, artist and independent scholar in London. www.domingomartinez.es 

Matt Rowe  Matt Rowe (b. 1981, United Kingdom) received his MA in Ceramics from the University of Wales Institute Cardiff in 2004. He previously spent 3 years as a student at Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College where he received his BA hon’s in Ceramics and Glass. Matt has recently attended the funded residencies, ‘59.14 N 3.34 W’ curated by Laura Mansfield at the The Erlend Williamson Art Fellowship with support from The Orkney Cultural Fund and ‘Landscape City and People’, a collaborative residency with artist Mathilde Lavenne at La Malterie, Lille.In 2011 he was selected as artist in residence for the Folkestone Triennial. Matt’s previous exhibitions include ‘Make! Believe! Make!’ at the Portsmouth City Museum in conjunction with Aspex Gallery. ‘Au’ at Beers Contemporary, London, ‘Beyond Savage’ at George’s House, Folkestone and ‘Dark Harvest’ for the Cheriton Art Lands Project. Matt also runs the B&B Project Space in Folkestone and is a founding member of ‘Club Shepway’ arts collective, which stages and curates projects. Club Shepway have recently completed their 3rd program of Vernacular Events, ‘Vernacular Habitation’. http://mattroweportfolio.co.uk

Sarah Sparkes Sarah Sparkes is an artist and curator. She runs the visual arts and research project GHost and has published on and regularly lectures about this subject.  She has exhibited widely, both in the UK and internationally.  Recent exhibitions and commissions include: Theatrical Dynamics at Torrance Art Museum, Los Angeles, U.S.A;  Overtime at London Maritime Museum and Stephen Lawrence Gallery; Haunted Landscapes at Falmouth University and AIRM2014, Romney Marsh, U.K.  She is currently developing a new commission for a touring exhibition exploring science and magic, curated by Rob La Frenais and will be participating in Fall of the Rebel Angels at this year’s Venice Biennale.   Recent publications: “The GHost Project: manifesting ghosts through visual art and creative research.” In: The Ashgate Research Companion to Paranormal Cultures , edited by Olu. Jenzen & Sally R Munt, (Ashgate: 2013); “Guests, hosts and ghosts and how to make them.” In: Giving up the Ghost: the haunting of modern culture, edited by Kirsten Gwyer and Karen Leeder, (Palgrave Macmillon:  due 2015); “Ghosts and GHost Project.” In: Ghosts, Spirits, and Psychics: The Paranormal from Alchemy to Zombies, edited by Matt Cardin (ABC Clio: due 2015). www.sarahsparkes.com

Sam Treadaway Sam Treadaway is a UK-based artist whose practice includes sculpture and installation, book-arts, scent-works, and occasional live events. In making use of existing frictions between aesthetic form and utilitarian function, he edits and re-aligns found objects, structures and systems, thus generating new outcomes. The interplay between the arts and other fields of knowledge, such as science and philosophy, often inform these processes. Together with Ricarda Vidal, Sam Treadaway curates and organises the collaborative and international project Revolve:R. Forthcoming exhibitions (2015) include: ‘PROTECHT’, Bank Space Gallery, London, UK; ‘Bideford Black: Next Generation Commissions’, Burton Art Gallery, Bideford, UK; Recent exhibitions (2014) include: ‘Revolve:R’, Choisi Gallery, Lugano, Switzerland, CH.; ‘Sniff Disc’, Translation Games, Southbank Centre, London, UK; ’63_360′, B&B Gallery, Folkestone, UK; Engagement and Entrapment, Binyamin Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel, ISR. www.samtreadaway.com